Top News

Corner Brook Regional High student motivated to help others through Me to We

Alex Williams is the student leader of the Me to We at Corner Brook Regional High.
Alex Williams is the student leader of the Me to We at Corner Brook Regional High. - Diane Crocker

Alex Williams is part of a group of students at Corner Brook Regional High who are working to change the world, locally and globally.

Williams is a Level 2 student at the school and the student leader of Me to We at Corner Brook Regional High.

Last year while in Level 1, she used to see posters around the school all the time for Me to We.

Those posters piqued her interest.

Williams said there are a lot of issues out there that people face that others have been shielded from.

“When I became aware of them I started to think, ‘why can’t we help them?’ If we’re so fortunate to be given the necessities, why can’t we help them and provide them with the things they need to live as well?”

She decided that she wanted to get involved, but when she returned to school this past September there was no mention of the club starting up.

She approached the sponsoring teacher, Shawn Bradbury, who asked her if she wanted to lead the group.

So, Williams started a Facebook page and enlisted some friends and, since then, the group of 12 has been busy bringing about change.

For the past six weeks, the group has been volunteering every Tuesday at the Salvation Army soup kitchen on O’Connell Drive. They take turns with two or three members going each week.

The experience for her really shows the struggle in the community.

“For some people it’s just a social aspect, it’s a gathering, but for some people it’s something they need to survive. They need these soup kitchens because they’re not getting a meal anywhere,” she said.

“By volunteering, we’re talking to those people and they actually open up and share things, their struggles.”

She said the people she’s met appreciate having somewhere to go and being able to interact with the volunteers.

That leaves her feeling good.

“It’s really rewarding to help people,” she said.

For its global project, the group has undertaken raising money to improve health care in Ethiopia.

“We saw a lot of the health-crisis issues there and the water crisis that is going on and decided that would be a great place to help out.”

The group has been selling rafiki bracelets and recently held a four-on-four volleyball tournament to raise money.

On May 4, some of the members participated in We Day Connect, an interactive, online event bringing students and educators within the Me to We movement together to celebrate volunteerism.

It’s through that event that they got the idea for their next big event.

Williams said the group is planning a water walk for September that will be open to the school and the community.

To symbolize the walk women and children make daily, sometimes multiple times, to access water, Williams said they’ll walk around the school.

“A lot of the illnesses in Ethiopia have to do with lack of clean water and sanitization,” she said.

The group plans to direct some of the money raised to providing a clean water supply and some of it to purchasing medicine and medical supplies.

The group will also be doing some fundraising to attend We Day in Los Angeles in 2019.

Recent Stories