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Community lends a hand to Justin Frampton's family


An army of Justin Frampton’s family and friends — and some people who never knew him well — are coming together to support his family.

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The 34-year-old father of two, who was diagnosed in February this year with glioblastoma, died Wednesday. Along with his wife Joan, their three-year-old son Grady and their three-month-old daughter Stella, he’ll be remembered by his mothers, his grandfather, his siblings and by many friends who hold him dear.

Terry Doyle, who’s been friends with him since they were four years old, said Frampton was magnetic.  

“He attracted people to him, and then held all of those people together, creating community,” Doyle said.

“He was unapologetic, opinionated, accepting, and he loved and laughed often and openly. He made people feel comfortable because he could always see you for exactly who you were, and he would love you for it. He was funny, always, and right until the end.

“When he got sick there must have been 20 people who said ‘he's my best friend,’ and every one of them were correct: he was. And he was my best friend too. The best I could ever hope for.”

Frampton’s situation struck a familiar chord with friends of Sarah Turpin, a mother of three who died of at 32 years old. Turpin’s life ended a week after she was diagnosed with choriocarcinoma, an extremely rare and very aggressive cancer. To help support her partner and children, a group of artistic friends designed Christmas cards to sell, and donated proceeds to the family.

The following year, those behind the initiative sold cards again, this time donating to Young Adult Cancer Canada. This year, the plan was to sell cards to support Frampton as he spent as much time as possible with his family.

“There are too many similarities between their stories for us to ignore,” said Hillary Winter, one of the artists. She said Frampton was an acquaintance of hers, and they had mutual friends.

“I knew his story, knew he had two young kids, and knew that his diagnosis was terminal. I knew he was trying to spend a little bit more time with his family,” she said. “We just thought this is too paralleled for us to ignore, and he deserves time with his family that Sarah didn’t get.”

The morning the first batch of cards arrived, they got the bad news.

“It was a bit of a shock. We were really excited, and then very heartbroken within two hours. So that was pretty difficult. But it’s the same concept now, except we’re giving Joan, his wife, more time to spend with her kids and learn how to grieve and process all of this.”

Sarah’s sister, Jennah Turpin, said she didn’t know Frampton well, either, but the story really resonated with her and her family.

“I am sending all my strength to Joan to carry on and keep Justin's memory alive for those beautiful children,” she said. “I know at this stage, money is the very last thing on her mind, but we are trying to raise as much as we can so it may stay the last thing on her mind.”

Continuing the card project annually is a way of honouring her sister. She said she’s incapable of expressing how grateful she is to her friends for starting the project.

“I am now so thankful to partake myself, and to be able to keep Sarah's memory alive through helping a young mother, so much like herself, during this painful time.”

Doyle said his best friend will be missed dearly by his family, and by himself, “but will always have the support of the army of friends and family who loved him.

“The card sale will go a long way to help them, too.”

The cards — with festive designs by Winter and Turpin, along with Mike Gough, Jillian Gardiner and Anne Downton — are for sale this year at several St. John’s businesses: Fixed Coffee and Baking, The Ramada, Reps Fitness, Moksha Yoga, The Guv’nor, Sound Salon, Twisted Sisters and Mochanopoly. Packages of 10 cards (five new designs and five old ones) will be sold for $20.

Frampton's obituary can be viewed here.

lpower@thetelegram.com

Twitter: @TelyLouis

RELATED STORIES:

Survivors unite at annual YACC conference

Support floods in for Sarah’s kids

The 34-year-old father of two, who was diagnosed in February this year with glioblastoma, died Wednesday. Along with his wife Joan, their three-year-old son Grady and their three-month-old daughter Stella, he’ll be remembered by his mothers, his grandfather, his siblings and by many friends who hold him dear.

Terry Doyle, who’s been friends with him since they were four years old, said Frampton was magnetic.  

“He attracted people to him, and then held all of those people together, creating community,” Doyle said.

“He was unapologetic, opinionated, accepting, and he loved and laughed often and openly. He made people feel comfortable because he could always see you for exactly who you were, and he would love you for it. He was funny, always, and right until the end.

“When he got sick there must have been 20 people who said ‘he's my best friend,’ and every one of them were correct: he was. And he was my best friend too. The best I could ever hope for.”

Frampton’s situation struck a familiar chord with friends of Sarah Turpin, a mother of three who died of at 32 years old. Turpin’s life ended a week after she was diagnosed with choriocarcinoma, an extremely rare and very aggressive cancer. To help support her partner and children, a group of artistic friends designed Christmas cards to sell, and donated proceeds to the family.

The following year, those behind the initiative sold cards again, this time donating to Young Adult Cancer Canada. This year, the plan was to sell cards to support Frampton as he spent as much time as possible with his family.

“There are too many similarities between their stories for us to ignore,” said Hillary Winter, one of the artists. She said Frampton was an acquaintance of hers, and they had mutual friends.

“I knew his story, knew he had two young kids, and knew that his diagnosis was terminal. I knew he was trying to spend a little bit more time with his family,” she said. “We just thought this is too paralleled for us to ignore, and he deserves time with his family that Sarah didn’t get.”

The morning the first batch of cards arrived, they got the bad news.

“It was a bit of a shock. We were really excited, and then very heartbroken within two hours. So that was pretty difficult. But it’s the same concept now, except we’re giving Joan, his wife, more time to spend with her kids and learn how to grieve and process all of this.”

Sarah’s sister, Jennah Turpin, said she didn’t know Frampton well, either, but the story really resonated with her and her family.

“I am sending all my strength to Joan to carry on and keep Justin's memory alive for those beautiful children,” she said. “I know at this stage, money is the very last thing on her mind, but we are trying to raise as much as we can so it may stay the last thing on her mind.”

Continuing the card project annually is a way of honouring her sister. She said she’s incapable of expressing how grateful she is to her friends for starting the project.

“I am now so thankful to partake myself, and to be able to keep Sarah's memory alive through helping a young mother, so much like herself, during this painful time.”

Doyle said his best friend will be missed dearly by his family, and by himself, “but will always have the support of the army of friends and family who loved him.

“The card sale will go a long way to help them, too.”

The cards — with festive designs by Winter and Turpin, along with Mike Gough, Jillian Gardiner and Anne Downton — are for sale this year at several St. John’s businesses: Fixed Coffee and Baking, The Ramada, Reps Fitness, Moksha Yoga, The Guv’nor, Sound Salon, Twisted Sisters and Mochanopoly. Packages of 10 cards (five new designs and five old ones) will be sold for $20.

Frampton's obituary can be viewed here.

lpower@thetelegram.com

Twitter: @TelyLouis

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