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Corner Brook rooster finds a new home in Reidville

The NL West SPCA is looking for a new home for this rooster. The rooster was turned over to the SPCA in Corner Brook on Monday.
The NL West SPCA is looking for a new home for this rooster. The rooster was turned over to the SPCA in Corner Brook on Monday. - Diane Crocker

The rooster turned into the NL West SPCA in Corner Brook earlier this week has found a new place to crow.

Newly named Dallas is now living in barn in Reidville with a mini pig named Kevin Bacon.

The rooster was taken to the SPCA on Monday because its owner could no longer keep him. Under the City of Corner Brook’s Urban Hen Regulations roosters can’t be kept in the city, and Dallas’s crowing had been causing some issues.

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NL West SPCA trying to find a home for a rooster

The SPCA reached out to the public to find him a new home through its Facebook page and by contacting some people around the area it knew kept chickens.

Nicole Glover was one of the people SPCA shelter manager Kim Fraser reached out to.

Glover and her husband Scott Cook are known animal rescuers and, after talking with Fraser, she agreed to take the rooster.

Turns out a lot of other people thought she’d offer him a good home as she was tagged about 50 times in the SPCA post.

Rescuing animals is something Glover has been doing since she was child growing up in Flat Bay.

She and Cook settled in Reidville because they wanted to have a farm. “We’ve kind of got a little paradise area here.”

They started off their rescue efforts with a pony and now have a whole bunch of rescued farm animals.

Asked why they do it, he reply is simply: “Why not?”

They do it because they really love animals, she said.

“And it’s sad when people turn their backs on them. Whether it’s a rooster, or a cat or a dog, they all have feelings. They all have little hearts that beat.”

And to Glover and Cook they become pets.

When Dallas arrived on Tuesday night Glover took him up to cuddle. “And he stayed like that for about an hour before I put him down.”

She figures he’s about four-five months old and is currently free-ranging until they get a coop built for him.

So far he’s had no trouble settling in to his new home and spent a lot of Wednesday outside doing loops around the peacocks.

Glover figures he might have been trying to figure out what these new birds were. “He’s pretty taken with them.”

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