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Finding your fine feed of local fish


Catch it, buy it, pay to have it served — local seafood is available.

While direct-buy of seafood from a local harvester is possible, there are other ways of getting hold of a feed of local seafood.

Earlier this week, The Telegram highlighted the budding business in direct sales by fish harvesters, but there are more traditional routes to the catch of the day.

One option is to catch it yourself. The recreational cod fishery was the route for Michael Norman and his son, Graysen Norman, who decided to take advantage of the annual food fishery on Tuesday, making the run out of Petty Harbour. It took them less then two hours to land two fish nearly as big as the three-year-old.

RELATED STORIES:

Keep an eye out for fresh cod as N.L. shellfish sells out

Direct-buy seafood still finding its sea legs

Just be sure to follow the rules set out, particularly around season and catch limits.

New rules for 2016 have made it easier for tour boats to help you get a feed of local cod, with operations ready to sail you out and send you away a few hours later with the fruits of your labour. Whether it’s with Captain Dave from Prime Berth in the Twillingate area, or Ocean Quest tours sailing from Petty Harbour — who both offer the service — simply check with the nearest tour provider.

The next option is straight from a processor or fish retailer.  

At The Fish Depot on Duckworth Street in St. John’s Tuesday morning, owner and operator Bernard Shannahan pulled the last of the local lobster out of his store tank and drained the water. Lobster season is done and the focus for fish harvesters is turning to cod, meaning the shop (supplied by local harvesters and processing operations) is doing the same.

The last few local lobsters get dropped in boiling water before being packaged and stored in a freezer.

“The reason I do this is people want Newfoundland lobster. And when the season is over, you can’t get ’em,” Shannahan said.

Seafood is like produce — the freshest product will be what is locally in season, but people such as Shannahan can talk to you all about that. Processors and retailers also make it possible to obtain favourites beyond when you might otherwise come across it at the wharf.

There can be uncommon finds as well, if you keep an eye out. Sobeys off Kelsey Drive in St. John’s, for example, was carrying Newfoundland and Labrador quahogs on Tuesday. The hard clam is not allowed for sale through a direct buy, due to food safety restrictions, but can be sourced by retailers.

Another option for your big feed is a local restaurant.

You don’t always have to go in before you know what’s available. Calling ahead is an option, but a favourite spot may also make some noise about new ingredients fresh from the wharf. As an example, Magnum & Steins in downtown St. John’s promotes its latest on social media (Twitter: @MagnumSteins) — from freshly caught local cod available Tuesday evening to a shot of a whole halibut, brought in July 15. Oliver’s Restaurant (@Olivers160) has taken to posting pictures of the daily menu board, with dishes of cod and halibut featured Tuesday as locally sourced seafood.

“We get it wherever we can get it. Fresh is the only thing,” said Angela Chafe of Chafe’s Landing in Petty Harbour, speaking with The Telegram about her fish supply.

Chafe and her more than 30 staff members have been serving up seafood from local harvesters (her husband is one) and longtime reliable suppliers like Taylor’s since opening.

Traditional fish and chips is the Number 1 seller, but as with any restaurant, the menu can surprise.

“We do fish taco, we do pan-fried fish,” she said. “We serve whole lobster meals. A lot of people don’t expect that.”

Other lobster favourites include the lobster macaroni and cheese, and the lobster poutine.

afitzpatrick@thetelegram.com

While direct-buy of seafood from a local harvester is possible, there are other ways of getting hold of a feed of local seafood.

Earlier this week, The Telegram highlighted the budding business in direct sales by fish harvesters, but there are more traditional routes to the catch of the day.

One option is to catch it yourself. The recreational cod fishery was the route for Michael Norman and his son, Graysen Norman, who decided to take advantage of the annual food fishery on Tuesday, making the run out of Petty Harbour. It took them less then two hours to land two fish nearly as big as the three-year-old.

RELATED STORIES:

Keep an eye out for fresh cod as N.L. shellfish sells out

Direct-buy seafood still finding its sea legs

Just be sure to follow the rules set out, particularly around season and catch limits.

New rules for 2016 have made it easier for tour boats to help you get a feed of local cod, with operations ready to sail you out and send you away a few hours later with the fruits of your labour. Whether it’s with Captain Dave from Prime Berth in the Twillingate area, or Ocean Quest tours sailing from Petty Harbour — who both offer the service — simply check with the nearest tour provider.

The next option is straight from a processor or fish retailer.  

At The Fish Depot on Duckworth Street in St. John’s Tuesday morning, owner and operator Bernard Shannahan pulled the last of the local lobster out of his store tank and drained the water. Lobster season is done and the focus for fish harvesters is turning to cod, meaning the shop (supplied by local harvesters and processing operations) is doing the same.

The last few local lobsters get dropped in boiling water before being packaged and stored in a freezer.

“The reason I do this is people want Newfoundland lobster. And when the season is over, you can’t get ’em,” Shannahan said.

Seafood is like produce — the freshest product will be what is locally in season, but people such as Shannahan can talk to you all about that. Processors and retailers also make it possible to obtain favourites beyond when you might otherwise come across it at the wharf.

There can be uncommon finds as well, if you keep an eye out. Sobeys off Kelsey Drive in St. John’s, for example, was carrying Newfoundland and Labrador quahogs on Tuesday. The hard clam is not allowed for sale through a direct buy, due to food safety restrictions, but can be sourced by retailers.

Another option for your big feed is a local restaurant.

You don’t always have to go in before you know what’s available. Calling ahead is an option, but a favourite spot may also make some noise about new ingredients fresh from the wharf. As an example, Magnum & Steins in downtown St. John’s promotes its latest on social media (Twitter: @MagnumSteins) — from freshly caught local cod available Tuesday evening to a shot of a whole halibut, brought in July 15. Oliver’s Restaurant (@Olivers160) has taken to posting pictures of the daily menu board, with dishes of cod and halibut featured Tuesday as locally sourced seafood.

“We get it wherever we can get it. Fresh is the only thing,” said Angela Chafe of Chafe’s Landing in Petty Harbour, speaking with The Telegram about her fish supply.

Chafe and her more than 30 staff members have been serving up seafood from local harvesters (her husband is one) and longtime reliable suppliers like Taylor’s since opening.

Traditional fish and chips is the Number 1 seller, but as with any restaurant, the menu can surprise.

“We do fish taco, we do pan-fried fish,” she said. “We serve whole lobster meals. A lot of people don’t expect that.”

Other lobster favourites include the lobster macaroni and cheese, and the lobster poutine.

afitzpatrick@thetelegram.com

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