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SiRT probe launched into discovery of body in Sydney Mines

This photograph of Kobe Clarence Pink, right, with brother George and mother Arlene, was one of dozens of pictures featured on a five-and-a-half minute Facebook video tribute that George made to his younger brother who would have celebrated his 16th birthday on Monday.
This photograph of Kobe Clarence Pink, right, with brother George and mother Arlene, was one of dozens of pictures featured on a five-and-a-half minute Facebook video tribute that George made to his younger brother who would have celebrated his 16th birthday on Monday.

SYDNEY MINES, N.S. — The province’s Serious Incident Response Team has taken over the investigation into the New Year’s Day discovery of a deceased young male that has been confirmed by family as being missing teenager Kobe Pink.

According to Staff/Sgt. Ken O’Neill of the Cape Breton Regional Police, the body was located along the shore below the cliffs in the Cranberry area of Sydney Mines during a search for a missing teenager who was last seen on Wednesday evening.

O’Neill said the head of the Cape Breton Regional Police ground search and rescue team and members of the CBRP dive unit discovered the body while checking the area.

Police had been looking for Point Aconi teen Kobe Clarence Pink, whose 16th birthday was Monday. He was last seen at a Sydney Mines residence just before 10 p.m. on Dec. 28.

While the name of the deceased has yet to be officially released, local activity on social media confirms that the body is that of the missing teen. On the Facebook pages of the boy’s parents and brother, the prayers and messages of hope from earlier were replaced by condolences.

While stopped in Toronto on his way home from Fort McMurray on Sunday, Kobe’s brother, George J. Pink, posted on Facebook: “My heart and soul is crushed.”

On Monday he used the same social media forum to post a five-and-a-half minute video tribute to his younger brother that was viewed and within hours had been viewed by more than 40,000 people, hundreds whom passed on their thoughts, prayers and condolences.

The elder sibling also used Facebook to share his emotions with family and friends.

“Happy 16th birthday Kobe Pink. I wish you were here to celebrate it. I'm sure we would be playing some new game co-op eating pizza and making silly remarks as we always have. I will love you and remember you for the rest of my life. You are my life, my inspiration, my hope, my strength,” he wrote.

Also on Monday, dozens of family members and friends gathered at the family’s Point Aconi home to share their grief over their sudden and tragic loss.

Following the discovery of the body, the CBRP’s forensic identification and major crime units began the investigation, but referred the incident to Nova Scotia’s Serious Incident Response Team (SiRT), that has a mandate to investigate all serious incidents ‘that may have arisen from the actions of police.’

SiRT’s civilian director Ron MacDonald said the referral was made after local police determined the deceased young male may have been part of a group of youths that was at a Peck Street residence on the evening of Dec. 28 when the CBPS responded to an unrelated complaint.

“There’s been no complaint from the public – the referral came from the police who contacted us and said ‘here’s the facts as we understand them’ and as a result of that it was determined that we should conduct an investigation,” said MacDonald.

He added that the initial probe revealed that several young persons fled the scene when the police responded to the Peck Street call last Wednesday evening.

That incident coincided with the last known sighting of the missing teenager. The subsequent search involved family, friends, the CBRP’s ground search and rescue, the force’s dive team, the Sydney Mines fire department, and a Department of Natural Resource’s helicopter.

Along with MacDonald, a lawyer and former Crown attorney, SiRT is comprised of two civilian investigators (both former RCMP officers); two full-time seconded police officers (one from the Halifax Regional Police and one from the RCMP); and other police and administrative support as required.

Under the province’s Police Act, the director of SiRT is obligated to file a public report within three months of the conclusion of an investigation.

Anyone with any information on the matter is asked to contact SiRT at 1-855-450-2010.

david.jala@cbpost.com

According to Staff/Sgt. Ken O’Neill of the Cape Breton Regional Police, the body was located along the shore below the cliffs in the Cranberry area of Sydney Mines during a search for a missing teenager who was last seen on Wednesday evening.

O’Neill said the head of the Cape Breton Regional Police ground search and rescue team and members of the CBRP dive unit discovered the body while checking the area.

Police had been looking for Point Aconi teen Kobe Clarence Pink, whose 16th birthday was Monday. He was last seen at a Sydney Mines residence just before 10 p.m. on Dec. 28.

While the name of the deceased has yet to be officially released, local activity on social media confirms that the body is that of the missing teen. On the Facebook pages of the boy’s parents and brother, the prayers and messages of hope from earlier were replaced by condolences.

While stopped in Toronto on his way home from Fort McMurray on Sunday, Kobe’s brother, George J. Pink, posted on Facebook: “My heart and soul is crushed.”

On Monday he used the same social media forum to post a five-and-a-half minute video tribute to his younger brother that was viewed and within hours had been viewed by more than 40,000 people, hundreds whom passed on their thoughts, prayers and condolences.

The elder sibling also used Facebook to share his emotions with family and friends.

“Happy 16th birthday Kobe Pink. I wish you were here to celebrate it. I'm sure we would be playing some new game co-op eating pizza and making silly remarks as we always have. I will love you and remember you for the rest of my life. You are my life, my inspiration, my hope, my strength,” he wrote.

Also on Monday, dozens of family members and friends gathered at the family’s Point Aconi home to share their grief over their sudden and tragic loss.

Following the discovery of the body, the CBRP’s forensic identification and major crime units began the investigation, but referred the incident to Nova Scotia’s Serious Incident Response Team (SiRT), that has a mandate to investigate all serious incidents ‘that may have arisen from the actions of police.’

SiRT’s civilian director Ron MacDonald said the referral was made after local police determined the deceased young male may have been part of a group of youths that was at a Peck Street residence on the evening of Dec. 28 when the CBPS responded to an unrelated complaint.

“There’s been no complaint from the public – the referral came from the police who contacted us and said ‘here’s the facts as we understand them’ and as a result of that it was determined that we should conduct an investigation,” said MacDonald.

He added that the initial probe revealed that several young persons fled the scene when the police responded to the Peck Street call last Wednesday evening.

That incident coincided with the last known sighting of the missing teenager. The subsequent search involved family, friends, the CBRP’s ground search and rescue, the force’s dive team, the Sydney Mines fire department, and a Department of Natural Resource’s helicopter.

Along with MacDonald, a lawyer and former Crown attorney, SiRT is comprised of two civilian investigators (both former RCMP officers); two full-time seconded police officers (one from the Halifax Regional Police and one from the RCMP); and other police and administrative support as required.

Under the province’s Police Act, the director of SiRT is obligated to file a public report within three months of the conclusion of an investigation.

Anyone with any information on the matter is asked to contact SiRT at 1-855-450-2010.

david.jala@cbpost.com

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