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Editorial: Our gift to you

This Christmas, we offer you a to-do and to-don’t list from our editorial elf.
This Christmas, we offer you a to-do and to-don’t list from our editorial elf.

Happy holidays, dear readers.

In the spirit of the season, we offer this short list of ways to approach things in the coming days.

Do: finish your shopping and wrapping with a little time to spare.

Don’t: overshop to the point of near-exhaustion, take out your frustrations on retail staff, other shoppers or the general public.

Do: take time to relax and unwind with family and friends.

Don’t: accept a free Christmas vacation trip from a billionaire who is lobbying your government for support and expect that it will be seen as anything but a grotesque conflict of interest.

Do: enjoy all things in moderation, or perhaps a little more than moderation, as long as you’re sensible about it.

Don’t: drink and drive, or in any other way contribute to the workload of the professional emergency personnel on call through the Christmas period.

Do: get outside, and perhaps roam some of the woods trails and parkland that we are lucky enough to have in this province.

Do: remember that the holidays can be extremely difficult for people dealing with mental health issues, depression and loneliness. Offer any help and support you can, remembering that the causes of such issues are complex, and their solutions are as well.

Don’t: decide to demonstrate your ability to create an aerial snow-angel by jumping backwards off your deck railing with your arms and legs outstretched, while holding a half-full beer bottle in each hand.

Do: enjoy your time off, if you are lucky enough to have it.

Don’t: forget there are many people working shifts this holiday season. You can’t change that, but you can at least be pleasant.

Do: remember that the holidays can be extremely difficult for people dealing with mental health issues, depression and loneliness. Offer any help and support you can, remembering that the causes of such issues are complex, and their solutions are as well.

Don’t: force or compel anyone to join your merriment, or belittle their legitimate feelings. “Cheer up, it’s Christmas you old Grinch,” is not likely to be in any way helpful.

Do: remember the less fortunate, including making needed donations to food banks and other service agencies.

Don’t: use food banks as a handy depository for all of your expired or near-expired food products. If you don’t want to eat a three-year-old quart can of pinto beans, chances are, no one else does, either.

Do: send tidings of comfort and joy, and welcome even unexpected guests into your home.

Don’t: use the entire military power of the United States to attack North Korea because “They certainly wouldn’t be expecting it this week.”

Do: enjoy a delicious Christmas dinner, if you are fortunate enough to have the circumstances to do so.

Don’t: feel you have to eat both turkey drumsticks, a half-pound of pease pudding, seven potatoes, 43 Brussels sprouts, six slices of ham, a mincemeat pie and six rum and Cokes, unless you’re auditioning for the role of “Elf in Bad Health.”

Do: be grateful for the blessings you have.

Don’t: forget that not everyone is in the same boat.

 

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