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Cheers & Jeers

This screengrab from a Telegram video shows Andy Wells (left) and Paul Lane in a verbal exchange July 20. — Ashley Fitzpatrick/The Telegram
This screengrab from a Telegram video shows Andy Wells (left) and Paul Lane in a verbal exchange July 20. — Ashley Fitzpatrick/The Telegram

Jeers: to insults. A video clip from Telegram reporter Ashley Fitzpatrick shared on Twitter and The Telegram’s website Friday shows some leopards never change their spots. It featured former St. John’s mayor and former chairman of the Public Utilities Board Andy Wells in a verbal clash with Independent MHA Paul Lane about Muskrat Falls and what questions might be asked of whom at the inquiry into the $12.7-billion hydroelectric project. While Lane maintained his cool and was even affable at times, Wells fell back on his usual approach in an argument, telling Lane: “You’re a disgraceful bag of wind. Get lost, b’y.” Charming.

Cheers: to photo finishes. To all those hardy souls who ventured out in hot weather for the 91st running of the Tely 10, whether you wheeled, walked or ran the 10-mile distance, kudos to you for your perseverance, drive and determination. The Tely 10 is an endurance test where everyone who crosses the finish line is truly a winner. Cheers, too, to volunteers who gave up their time to shout out encouragement and hand out H20.

Jeers: to no winners. A story in Friday’s Telegram by Glen Whiffen captured the dilemma that regularly plays out on the Bell Island ferry. Mandy Crane was taking the ferry to get to a dentist appointment Thursday when she slipped on the deck while walking on the ferry with her mother after they got out of their vehicle. Fortunately, she wasn’t seriously injured, but the blow she sustained to her head required a trip to the Health Sciences Centre by ambulance. She has cerebral palsy and uses a cane. Many ferry passengers who are ill, elderly, have mobility problems — or all three — have said they should be allowed to stay in their cars for the 20-minute crossing because they feel more secure their than navigating the decks of the ferry. The Department of Transportation and Works has to follow a safety directive that says passengers must leave their vehicles for the trip across the Tickle, for fear they’d become trapped should a fire or other emergency occur. It’s easy to see both sides of the argument, but that’s of little comfort to anyone personally affected by the situation.

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