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Brier pays off for Newfoundland curling

Brad Gushue, Mark Nichols, Brett Gallant and Geoff Walker weren’t the only big winners at the 2017 Tim Horton’s Brier. The Newfoundland and Labrador curling community has done well financially from the event.
Brad Gushue, Mark Nichols, Brett Gallant and Geoff Walker weren’t the only big winners at the 2017 Tim Horton’s Brier. The Newfoundland and Labrador curling community has done well financially from the event.

Bally Haly, St. John’s curling clubs, provincial association and junior curlers will benefit from 2017 event held in city

It appears it’s not just the city and province that did well off the Tim Horton’s Brier held last spring at Mile One Centre.

Figures obtained by The Telegram Friday show over $500,000 has been left to the Newfoundland and Labrador curling community from Curling Canada’s profits.

The St. John’s Brier attracted 122,592 fans to Mile One Centre, outdrawing the 2016 Canadian men’s curling championship held in Ottawa.

A story in this week’s Telegram indicated the Brier was worth an estimated $10.1 million in economic activity to the province, with $9.1 million of that benefiting the City of St. John's.

That’s according to the economic impact study undertaken by the Canadian Sport Tourism Association.

This week, both the Bally Haly Golf and Country Club, which houses a four-sheet curling facility, and the St. John’s Curling Club received cheques for $117,000 each. That’s 10 per cent of the net tickets sales from Curling Canada.

In addition to that, the Newfoundland and Labrador Curling Association received a percentage of Curling Canada’s overall profit, which comes out to $140,000.

Each club across the island and Labrador will receive some money from the proceeds, which will otherwise be earmarked for all aspects of curling development, from player and coaching development to travel assistance and grass roots curling.

Finally, the Newfoundland and Labrador Curling Foundation, which received profits from the 50-50 draws at Mile One, has about $175,000 to place in the bank. The Foundation is separate from the NLCA, but the funds will be primarily used for junior development — camps and clinics, travel, promotion and support for medium- to long-term athlete development.

 

rshort@thetelegram.com

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