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JANICE WELLS: Young Americans, and lumbering along

I had this fence planned long before lumber shortages and price hikes. Sometimes the old way is the best way. — Janice Wells photo
I had this fence planned long before lumber shortages and price hikes. Sometimes the old way is the best way. — Janice Wells photo

I’m writing this the day after Americans were discovered roaming freely in downtown St. John’s (imagine how bizarre that sentence would have sounded six months ago). I have no idea what the situation will be by the time this goes to print but I am flabbergasted. I’m also struggling with the knowledge that I have become xenophobic.

Next to being responsible for massive death numbers, that is perhaps the greatest harm Donald Trump and his enablers have perpetrated on the American people: other people are afraid of them. Around the world Americans have become pariahs. To date, 35 countries around the world have banned all travel from the United States. Americans are the one commodity for which a shortage is welcomed. I’m saddened and embarrassed for the country and all its responsible citizens, but thems the facts.

As of now I don’t know if it is true that the ’murcans were given exemptions but I feel comfortable commenting on it without the facts because it doesn’t matter a row of beans. If they were legitimately at large that decision was a bad one and if they weren’t, that decision was a bad one. The only difference is in who made the bad decision.

Janine is blaming the Yanks. Her theory is that they are used to a certain deference from Canada and probably thought nobody would make a big deal about in a backwater like New-FOUND-land. Who do they think they are?

What if it was a Canadian decision? Made without consulting our provincial officials. Who do they think they are?

If they were legitimately at large that decision was a bad one and if they weren’t, that decision was a bad one. The only difference is in who made the bad decision.

Sweet gentle adorable! After all we’ve been through trying to keep our province safe! People have died, lost their jobs and been separated from loved ones. Businesses have gone under or struggled to stay afloat. Essential workers have taken risks, students have had education interrupted, brides have put their weddings on hold and funerals have been held without the rituals of mourning.

We should all be furious and restaurant owners should be out for blood. Just when they’re starting to see business pick up because of all their and our precautions, some moron thinks it’s OK to let a few American military personnel stroll in, sit down and order.

If that moron is one of ours he/she/they should be disciplined/fired/hung out to dry. If it was one of theirs he/she/they should be fined heavily and an international complaint lodged.

Were you downtown that night? Were you in any of the places known to be invaded by Americans? You might know if you were but how do you know if you weren’t? Were they all in uniform? Maybe you’ll find out two weeks from now. How many people have you been in contact with in the meantime?

A kinder, gentler person could perhaps feel sorry for the poor Americans; imagine being in one of the safest places on Earth and not being able to enjoy it. I’m surprised we haven’t had more covert infiltration.

It’s not all covert. Take the fellow who stole a car, crashed through a closed border in B.C. then floated down a river (not in the car) for over two hours in an unsuccessful attempt to evade police. Looking at what’s going on in his country, you’d almost feel sorry for him. Like ducks.

Off on another tangent, B.C. makes me think of lumber. Lumber makes me think of the shortages that anyone looking for building supplies can attest to. (Don’t be writing me. Ending a sentence with a preposition is perfectly all right in the English language). Anyway, I am thus reminded to alert you to stock up on pressure-treated lumber.

Never mind toilet paper; the forestry industry has many pressures. Nowadays we think we can’t build a deck on the house without pressure-treated lumber and my building supply source tells me this commodity could be increasing in price by 300 per cent. Seems hard to believe, but who would have believed law-abiding citizens would be walking into banks wearing masks?

At this rate, we won’t be able to afford a fence to keep the Americans out so our officials had better get on the ball.

Janice Wells lives in St. John’s. She can be reached at janicew@nf.sympatico.ca.


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