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SaltWire Selects Oct. 26: A trail through time, coping with a stutter, a tale of two protests and a way to measure happiness

Charles Francis holds an axe and knife fashioned from moose antler, as well as an elaborately-carved walking stick that would have been a sign of wealth and status in traditional times.
Charles Francis holds an axe and knife fashioned from moose antler, as well as an elaborately-carved walking stick that would have been a sign of wealth and status in traditional times. - Christopher Connors

A trail through time 

Cape Breton Post reporter Chris Connors recently took part in the Eskasoni Cultural Journeys Goat Island interpretive experience.

He learned, among other things, about the Mi'kmaq four-cent cake, or luskinikn, as well as Mi’kmaq medicine and the use of local plants.

Check out the journey through Connors' photos

Lindsay Paul takes a break while tending the fire at his mock village along the Eskasoni Cultural Journeys Goat Island trail. - Christopher Connors
Lindsay Paul takes a break while tending the fire at his mock village along the Eskasoni Cultural Journeys Goat Island trail. - Christopher Connors


A tale of two protests

The current lobster fishing dispute in Southwest Nova Scotia and the Muskrat Fals hydroelectric project in Newfoundland and Labrador spawned two of the most memorable and divisive protests in Atlantic Canada in recent years. 

SaltWire's Evan Careen sees parallels and differences between the two issues, most notably the police response to each. 

In this news analysis piece, Careen details some of the history of each issue and analyzes the response

"...There’s a problem in the system," he writes. "Does the system see more value in a hydroelectric dam than it does in the safety of Indigenous people?" 

The blockade at the Muskrat Falls site outside Happy Valley-Goose Bay in October of 2016. - FILE PHOTO - File Photo
The blockade at the Muskrat Falls site outside Happy Valley-Goose Bay in October of 2016. - FILE PHOTO - File Photo


A stutterer in an out-loud world

The Chronicle Herald's John MacPhee had an attraction to words since childhood. But speaking those words was another story.

MacPhee has a stutter. He remembers being almost physically ill before having to speak in front of his class in high school. 

Why did he decide to write about it? 

MacPhee was inspired by U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden and his own struggles to overcome a stutter and his efforts to raise awareness of the condition. 

In that spirit, we're helping him raise awareness, too. Read MacPhee's story here

 Joe Biden, the Democratic Party's presidential candidate, has promoted awareness of stuttering, particularly for young people. - Reuters- Reuters
- Reuters


How happy are you? 

Connolly Aziz started studying positive psychology after seeing positive results at the gym. He learned there is a scientific way to measure well-being, much like his personal trainer measured his body.

“That’s when a light bulb went off in my head,” said Aziz, who moved to P.E.I. in 2019 where he is continuing his masters studies.

He decided to take those well-being measurements further, reports Cindy Nguyen, a student journalist at the Guardian. 

On Oct. 1, Aziz began running an online survey called the P.E.I. Wellbeing Project collecting data from Island residents about how happy they think they are.

Click through to find out more about what Aziz is hoping to discover and why it's important for all of us to measure our happiness

Connolly Aziz is working on the PEI Wellbeing Project. Cindy Nguyen photo. - Contributed
Connolly Aziz is working on the PEI Wellbeing Project. Cindy Nguyen photo. - Contributed


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