Top News

Potlotek First Nation set to launch own fishery to mark Treaty Day

The Mi'kmaq community of 600 residents is getting ready to launch its own moderate livelihood fishery plan.
The Mi'kmaq community of 600 residents is getting ready to launch its own moderate livelihood fishery plan.
SYDNEY, N.S. —

The Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw Chiefs is offering its full support as Potlotek First Nation launches its moderate livelihood fisheries plan, Netukulimk Livelihood, Thursday to mark the Treaty Day celebrations.

The Mi’kmaq community of about 600 residents will launch its own fishing tags to help support the community, which has previously spoken about food security issues and last month started construction of its own food bank.

The moderate livelihood plan was developed with the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw Chiefs, Kwilmu’kw Maw-Klusuaqn Negotiation Office, and its own residents to ensure the plan followed netukulimk, a Mi’kmaw set of conservation rules to never take more than one needs.

Previously the Richmond County Inshore Fisheries Association met with Chief Wilbert Marshall of Potlotek to ensure a level of peace as the Potlotek fishery takes to St. Peter's Bay. Both parties wanted to avoid tensions seen at Saulnierville as Sipekne’kati’ki First Nation launched its own moderate livelihood fishery almost two weeks ago. Tensions have levelled enough at St. Mary's Bay that the assembly of chiefs lowered the state of emergency to a state of readiness.

The community of Potlotek First Nation is also planning a celebration to mark Treaty Day and the launch of its moderate livelihood plan.

RELATED:

Did this story inform or enhance your perspective on this subject?
1 being least likely, and 10 being most likely

Recent Stories