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Atlantic Charter’s 75th anniversary honoured in Ship Harbour


It was a pivotal wartime meeting between two of the most powerful world leaders, and it took place just off the coast of Newfoundland in Placentia Bay.

When United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill arrived in warships August of 1941 near Ship Harbour for the Atlantic Charter Conference, America wasn’t even involved in the Second World War. Issued Aug. 14, it outlined eight common principles the two countries shared for a post-war world.

On Sunday, a large crowd gathered at the site of the Atlantic Charter Monument, only a short distance from where the world leaders met, to recognize the 75th anniversary of the historic event. Among those on hand was Duncan Sandys, a great-grandson of Churchill.

“The ability of these two men in just a matter of days to write and agree (to) such a clear and powerful and succinct document that has lasted and will last through the ages is in itself remarkable, and is something for which all peace loving men and women should be grateful,” Sandys said during Sunday’s ceremony in Ship Harbour.

The ideals of the joint declaration, which was not a treaty, are widely linked to the formation of the United Nations. On its website, the intergovernmental organization tasked with promoting co-operation between nations states that four of the common principles bear directly on the UN.

Sunday’s ceremony included a re-enactment of the service of thanks held in 1941 aboard HMS Prince of Wales, the battleship that brought Churchill to Newfoundland. Rev. Lt. (N) Ian March-MacCuish led the service.

Placentia Mayor Wayne Power Jr. said he appreciated having Sandys in Ship Harbour to honour the occasion, noting his family also had a connection to the historic event. Power’s great-grandfather, John Power, helped pilot the ships into Placentia Bay as a lighthouse keeper on Fox Island.

“We are also very fortunate to have in our presence today numerous individuals from outside our local community, province and country who have a great interest in Churchill and Roosevelt and the historical significance of the secret meeting that occurred here off our shores,” he said.

SEE RELATED:

'Ship Harbour will celebrate important world event'

Sunday’s event was one of several held over the last few days in the Placentia area and St. John’s to commemorate the anniversary. A new play was presented in Placentia Friday based on the observations of Ship Harbour residents, and a special reception was held Saturday night at Canadian Forces Station St. John’s.

editor@cbncompass.ca

When United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill arrived in warships August of 1941 near Ship Harbour for the Atlantic Charter Conference, America wasn’t even involved in the Second World War. Issued Aug. 14, it outlined eight common principles the two countries shared for a post-war world.

On Sunday, a large crowd gathered at the site of the Atlantic Charter Monument, only a short distance from where the world leaders met, to recognize the 75th anniversary of the historic event. Among those on hand was Duncan Sandys, a great-grandson of Churchill.

“The ability of these two men in just a matter of days to write and agree (to) such a clear and powerful and succinct document that has lasted and will last through the ages is in itself remarkable, and is something for which all peace loving men and women should be grateful,” Sandys said during Sunday’s ceremony in Ship Harbour.

The ideals of the joint declaration, which was not a treaty, are widely linked to the formation of the United Nations. On its website, the intergovernmental organization tasked with promoting co-operation between nations states that four of the common principles bear directly on the UN.

Sunday’s ceremony included a re-enactment of the service of thanks held in 1941 aboard HMS Prince of Wales, the battleship that brought Churchill to Newfoundland. Rev. Lt. (N) Ian March-MacCuish led the service.

Placentia Mayor Wayne Power Jr. said he appreciated having Sandys in Ship Harbour to honour the occasion, noting his family also had a connection to the historic event. Power’s great-grandfather, John Power, helped pilot the ships into Placentia Bay as a lighthouse keeper on Fox Island.

“We are also very fortunate to have in our presence today numerous individuals from outside our local community, province and country who have a great interest in Churchill and Roosevelt and the historical significance of the secret meeting that occurred here off our shores,” he said.

SEE RELATED:

'Ship Harbour will celebrate important world event'

Sunday’s event was one of several held over the last few days in the Placentia area and St. John’s to commemorate the anniversary. A new play was presented in Placentia Friday based on the observations of Ship Harbour residents, and a special reception was held Saturday night at Canadian Forces Station St. John’s.

editor@cbncompass.ca

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