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Lawyer Gregory Noseworthy enters the St. John’s Ward 2 byelection race

Noseworthy: “I’m very keen on focusing on affordability and accessibility for seniors and other people who really are struggling to make ends meet. We hear about seniors going to the mall just trying to stay warm in the winter months, and I think that’s something the city can help address.” -CONTRIBUTED
Noseworthy: “I’m very keen on focusing on affordability and accessibility for seniors and other people who really are struggling to make ends meet. We hear about seniors going to the mall just trying to stay warm in the winter months, and I think that’s something the city can help address.” -CONTRIBUTED

His campaign issues include curbside composting, pedestrian mall expansion

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. —

Lawyer Gregory Noseworthy is the seventh candidate to enter the St. John’s Ward 2 byelection race, with election day still nearly two months away, on Oct. 20.

Noseworthy is a lawyer with a mobile private practice. He also describes himself as a community activist with experience on the board of St. John’s Pride and working with organizations such as the Public Legal Information Association of Newfoundland and Labrador, Seniors NL and Empower.

He told The Telegram that working with these groups enables him to see many of the issues faced by people in the city, specifically in Ward 2.


Seven so far

The seven people who have declared their candidacy for the Oct. 30 byelection to fill the vacant Ward 2 seat on St. John's City Council:

• Matt Howse

• Lorne Loder

• Gregory Noseworthy

• Ophelia Ravencroft

• Wallace Ryan

• Shawn Skinner

• Greg Smith


“The one everyone’s talking about is the Water Street (pedestrian) mall,” he said.

Noseworthy said he would work to make it an annual occurrence, as well as expand it to other times of the year, and include other downtown streets.

He said he’d also like to introduce curbside compost collection, preserve and expand the city’s green space, address traffic and noise concerns, and improve public transit and sidewalk snowclearing.

Noseworthy said he’s also committed to affordable housing.

“I’m very keen on focusing on affordability and accessibility for seniors and other people who really are struggling to make ends meet. We hear about seniors going to the mall just trying to stay warm in the winter months, and I think that’s something the city can help address.”


“I’m very keen on focusing on affordability and accessibility for seniors and other people who really are struggling to make ends meet." — Gregory Noseworthy


He said the city should maintain current services throughout the pandemic, and work to reduce administrative red tape to encourage small business growth.

And while the city already has an inclusion advisory committee, Noseworthy said he’d like to see an office of diversity and inclusion.

“It’s a way of having a firm office within the city that actually people can call … someone to actually sit down with people, hear the concerns and act with them during the regular day as opposed to an advisory committee that isn’t as operative during the daytime hours,” he said.

Noseworthy said that despite being a young candidate, he is experienced.

“I think that I can take my energy forward, and my experiences — my legal background, my volunteer experiences, community activism — and to bring forward the issues that are affecting the city today.”

While the nomination period doesn’t officially begin until Sept. 15, six others have also already declared their intention to run: Matt Howse, youth care worker and former Broken Books owner; Lorne Loder, a downtown restaurateur; Ophelia Ravencroft, an academic; Wallace Ryan, a cartoonist; Shawn Skinner, former city councillor and former MHA; and curler Greg Smith.

Twitter: @juanitamercer_


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