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Corner Brook's Jordan King prepares for life beyond hockey

Jordan King has come to terms with his future in hockey as he focuses his attention on education, but he hasn't closed the door on entertaining future pro opportunities if any come his way.
Jordan King has come to terms with his future in hockey as he focuses his attention on education, but he hasn't closed the door on entertaining future pro opportunities if any come his way. - Star file photo

Jordan King no longer has aspirations of breaking into the National Hockey League, but he’s not ruling out playing professionally in Europe, or anywhere else for that matter.

He’s taking the attitude that if it happens, that’s great, but if it doesn’t he will be just fine with a good education behind him.

Whatever the future holds, the 21-year-old Corner Brook native will view it as a bonus because his focus now is clearly on his kinesiology studies at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ont., where he is working toward a career that will see him work in the field of physiotherapy or occupational therapy.

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For the next four years, King will juggle his studies with a hectic hockey regime with the Lakehead University Thunderhawks — a team that is ranked No. 10 in male hockey in USports from coast to coast.

King has collected eight points in nine games, and is wearing a big smile these days because his team is enjoying the sweet ride of a six-game winning streak.

He loves the atmosphere with his new team and has enjoyed finding his niche in a league that he believes is a step better than anything he experienced along the journey.

Hockey has taken him to many places. He has met a lot of people who have become lifelong friends. He has been given a chance to become more independent and find out what successful people do to reach their goals, so he has enjoyed the ride.

More importantly, he believes he learned a lot about the importance of a strong work ethic and being willing to get along with and support his teammates, all of which he figures will prepare him well for a professional career that doesn’t include sticks and pucks.

“I’m ready to start a professional career. I’ve come to terms with the hockey part of it,” he said.

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